Meow Madness - Netflix

Thu 27 June 2019

Meow Madness is a Hallmark original annual sporting event with lovable kittens, all shapes, sizes and colors. Buoyed by the success of the Kitten Bowl, the Hallmark Channel is debuting a new show hosted by Beth Stern that will air on Monday, April 3 — the same day as the NCAA men's basketball national championship game. Stern, the wife of radio shock jock Howard Stern, is a huge cat ambassador who works year-round with the North Shore Animal League of America, urging people to spay, neuter and release and adopt pets. The Sterns are foster parents to kittens — a few hundred in all over the last couple years. Beth tries to find permanent homes, but letting go is never easy. "It's the hardest thing in the world to see them go", she said. "I think I've cried over 300 times".

The show is staged on a mini basketball court on a midtown Manhattan soundstage. Kittens, with cute names like Meow Ming, Lonso Fur-Ball, Stephen Furry and Meow-Tumbo roamed over the court as well as a faux-Vegas casino area where they could "make bets".

Meow Madness - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 120 minutes

Premier: 2017-04-03

Meow Madness - Dancing mania - Netflix

Dancing mania (also known as dancing plague, choreomania, St. John's Dance and St. Vitus's Dance) was a social phenomenon that occurred primarily in mainland Europe between the 14th and 17th centuries. It involved groups of people dancing erratically, sometimes thousands at a time. The mania affected men, women, and children who danced until they collapsed from exhaustion. One of the first major outbreaks was in Aachen, in the Holy Roman Empire, in 1374, and it quickly spread throughout Europe; one particularly notable outbreak occurred in Strasbourg in 1518, also in the Holy Roman Empire. Affecting thousands of people across several centuries, dancing mania was not an isolated event, and was well documented in contemporary reports. It was nevertheless poorly understood, and remedies were based on guesswork. Generally, musicians accompanied dancers, to help ward off the mania, but this tactic sometimes backfired by encouraging more to join in. There is no consensus among modern-day scholars as to the cause of dancing mania. The several theories proposed range from religious cults being behind the processions to people dancing to relieve themselves of stress and put the poverty of the period out of their minds. It is speculated to have been a mass hysteria, in which physical symptoms with no known physical cause are observed to affect a group of people, as a form of social influence.

Meow Madness - Explanations - Netflix

Numerous hypotheses have been proposed for the causes of dancing mania, and it remains unclear whether it was a real illness or a social phenomenon. One of the most prominent theories is that victims suffered from ergot poisoning, which was known as St. Anthony's fire in the Middle Ages. During floods and damp periods, ergots were able to grow and affect rye and other crops. Ergotism can cause hallucinations and convulsions, but cannot account for the other strange behaviour most commonly identified with dancing mania. Other theories suggest that the symptoms were similar to encephalitis, epilepsy, and typhus, but as with ergotism, those conditions cannot account for all symptoms. Numerous sources discuss how dancing mania, and tarantism, may have simply been the result of stress and tension caused by natural disasters around the time, such as plagues and floods. Hetherington and Munro describe dancing mania as a result of “shared stress”; people may have danced to relieve themselves of the stress and poverty of the day, and in so doing, attempted to become ecstatic and see visions. Another popular theory is that the outbreaks were all staged, and the appearance of strange behaviour was due to its unfamiliarity. Religious cults may have been acting out well-organised dances, in accordance with ancient Greek and Roman rituals. Despite being banned at the time, these rituals could be performed under the guise of uncontrollable dancing mania. Justus Hecker, a 19th-century medical writer, described it as a kind of festival, where a practice known as “the kindling of the Nodfyr” was carried out. This involved jumping through fire and smoke, in an attempt to ward off disease. Bartholomew notes how participants in this ritual would often continue to jump and leap long after the flames had gone. It is certain that many participants of dancing mania were psychologically disturbed, but it is also likely that some took part out of fear, or simply wished to copy everyone else. Sources agree that dancing mania was one of the earliest-recorded forms of mass hysteria, and describe it as a “psychic epidemic”, with numerous explanations that might account for the behaviour of the dancers. It has been suggested that the outbreaks may have been due to cultural contagion triggered, in times of particular hardship, by deeply rooted popular beliefs in the region regarding angry spirits capable of inflicting a “dancing curse” to punish their victims.

Meow Madness - References - Netflix